BC will obtain 94 new charging stations for electrical automobiles by the top of the yr

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The city of Coquitlam will receive 21 stations and the remaining 73 stations will be installed across the province to support the increasing number of electric vehicles in BC. to use

Author of the article:

Susan Lazaruk

Publication date:

July 29, 202121 minutes agoRead for 3 minutes Join the conversation Mayor Richard Stewart of Coquitlam at the announcement on Thursday. Mayor Richard Stewart of Coquitlam at the announcement on Thursday. Photo by Francis Georgian /PNG

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BC’s 94 newest EV charging stations will be installed by the end of the year and will be a welcome addition to the infrastructure network for EV owners.

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“They are DCFC (direct current fast chargers), they have high amperage, and they charge quickly,” said John Stonier, president of the Vancouver Electric Vehicle Association. “It’s not quite as fast as gasoline (filling up), but it works.”

About 80 percent of BC’s 55,000 electric cars are charged at home, which takes about one to three hours depending on battery usage, Stonier said. A public DCFC can charge a vehicle in about an hour.

“These are these stations, and they are expensive to install and use,” he said. As of May, BC Hydro started charging 27 cents a minute for its stations and Fortis is charging 30 cents a minute for theirs, he said. A top-up typically costs around $ 10.

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Public chargers allow electric vehicle owners to travel further from home, and the Vancouver Electric Vehicle Association hopes to one day see a charger every 100 to 150 km on every provincial road in the province.

“This is our political position that chargers should be provided equally across the province, regardless of the population base in an area,” he said.

There are many DCFCs in populated urban areas, according to Stonier, but “if you plan to travel from Smithers to Deas Lake and the Alaska Highway,” the availability of charging stations is less certain.

BC has more than 2,500 public charging stations, including 205 public DCFCs. There are two levels lower than DCFC, level 1 and 2, which take longer to charge a battery.

Tesla has its own network of 16 stations in BC for Tesla owners, but Tesla can be adapted to use public stations.

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Stonier said more chargers will be needed for the growing number of electric vehicles in BC, where they account for 10 percent of all auto sales (15 per in Vancouver), one of the highest adoption rates in North America.

EV station in Coquitlam. EV station in Coquitlam. Photo by Francis Georgian /PNG

Thursday’s announcement calls for plans to install BC Hydro 65 chargers across BC, the city of Coquitlam 21, and First Capital Asset Management eight. The federal government is providing all three organizations with partial funding totaling $ 470,000.

BC Hydro did not respond to a request for comment on the location of the stations.

Stonier said he would like to see every house, condo, and apartment equipped with an outlet for an electric car, much like they have outlets for clothes dryers and ovens.

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Seventeen communities in BC are in need of new condominiums to equip their parking lots with EV plugs.

It is more difficult to retrofit older buildings because landlords or local councils shy away from the costs and laws that introduce “right to fee regulations” are likely to be unpopular, said Stonier.

“You just can’t impose any costs, not everyone has the money,” he said. He said BC is doing the “next best” by providing grants to install chargers. For his condominium building, for example, about half of the $ 200,000 purchase and installation cost to equip 130 stalls with plugs is covered by provincial discounts.

A Tesla could be plugged into a standard 110-volt outlet, but it takes about eight hours to charge. And since the circuits are not rated for heavy loads, it would likely overload the breaker and flip it over.

However, Stonier said the 40 percent of British Columbians who live in apartment buildings can rely on public charging points when they drive 50 km a day, which is the North American average.

He said someone he knows is buying an electric vehicle with a range of 370 km on one charge, which he said would give a week and a half between charges.

“You will pay a premium (charging) tariff, but it’s still cheaper than gasoline,” he said.

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